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Using native HTML tags

The idea of the JSF 2.2 HTML5 dialect is to start with a native HTML page, and to add a few JSF attributes to make it an JSF view. AngularFaces take this idea to another level.

AngularFaces allows you to use these tags without a preceding "h:", even if there's no "jsf:" attribute:

  • <head /> becomes <h:head />
  • <body /> becomes <h:body />
  • <form /> becomes <h:form />
  • <label /> becomes <h:outputLabel />
  • <button /> becomes <h:commandButton (unless it has a "jsf:outcome" attribute, which converts <button /> into an <h:button>). />
  • <input /> can become many things, depending on the "type" attribute. AngularFaces 2.1 allows you to drop the "type" attribute. In this case, the type is derived from the JSF beans type. Numeric datatypes become "text='number'", java.util.Date becomes "type='date", boolean turns the input field into a check box and everything else becomes "type='text'".

Why, no, I don't want this feature!

You have to add a few lines to the web.xml to activate this features. AngularFaces 2.1 doesn't allow you to get rid of the feature altogether: it's needed internally. But you can chose between a progressive version and a conservative version. The latter only cares about a few tags:

  • h:messages and prime:messages
  • ngsync
  • translate and i18n

BootsFaces

The progressive tag decorator supports most tags of BootsFaces. This feature is activated only if BootsFaces is detected in the classpath.

Read the complete list of supported tag at the BootsFaces showcase.

What it looks like

Even if it's only a handful of changes, it's astonishing how much tidier these few changes make your JSF file looks:

Using native HTML tags

The idea of the JSF 2.2 HTML5 dialect is to start with a native HTML page, and to add a few JSF attributes to make it an JSF view. AngularFaces take this idea to another level.

AngularFaces allows you to use these tags without a preceding "h:", even if there's no "jsf:" attribute:

  • <head /> becomes <h:head />
  • <body /> becomes <h:body />
  • <form /> becomes <h:form />
  • <label /> becomes <h:outputLabel />
  • <button /> becomes <h:commandButton (unless it has a "jsf:outcome" attribute, which converts <button /> into an <h:button>). />
  • <input /> can become many things, depending on the "type" attribute. AngularFaces 2.1 allows you to drop the "type" attribute. In this case, the type is derived from the JSF beans type. Numeric datatypes become "text='number'", java.util.Date becomes "type='date", boolean turns the input field into a check box and everything else becomes "type='text'".

Why, no, I don't want this feature!

You have to add a few lines to the web.xml to activate this features. AngularFaces 2.1 doesn't allow you to get rid of the feature altogether: it's needed internally. But you can chose between a progressive version and a conservative version. The latter only cares about a few tags:

  • h:messages and prime:messages
  • ngsync
  • translate and i18n

BootsFaces

The progressive tag decorator supports most tags of BootsFaces. This feature is activated only if BootsFaces is detected in the classpath.

Read the complete list of supported tag at the BootsFaces showcase.

What it looks like

Even if it's only a handful of changes, it's astonishing how much tidier these few changes make your JSF file looks:

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Using native HTML tags

The idea of the JSF 2.2 HTML5 dialect is to start with a native HTML page, and to add a few JSF attributes to make it an JSF view. AngularFaces take this idea to another level.

AngularFaces allows you to use these tags without a preceding "h:", even if there's no "jsf:" attribute:

  • <head /> becomes <h:head />
  • <body /> becomes <h:body />
  • <form /> becomes <h:form />
  • <label /> becomes <h:outputLabel />
  • <button /> becomes <h:commandButton (unless it has a "jsf:outcome" attribute, which converts <button /> into an <h:button>). />
  • <input /> can become many things, depending on the "type" attribute. AngularFaces 2.1 allows you to drop the "type" attribute. In this case, the type is derived from the JSF beans type. Numeric datatypes become "text='number'", java.util.Date becomes "type='date", boolean turns the input field into a check box and everything else becomes "type='text'".

Why, no, I don't want this feature!

You have to add a few lines to the web.xml to activate this features. AngularFaces 2.1 doesn't allow you to get rid of the feature altogether: it's needed internally. But you can chose between a progressive version and a conservative version. The latter only cares about a few tags:

  • h:messages and prime:messages
  • ngsync
  • translate and i18n

BootsFaces

The progressive tag decorator supports most tags of BootsFaces. This feature is activated only if BootsFaces is detected in the classpath.

Read the complete list of supported tag at the BootsFaces showcase.

What it looks like

Even if it's only a handful of changes, it's astonishing how much tidier these few changes make your JSF file looks:

Für diese Seite gibt es noch keine deutsche Übersetzung. Bitte lesen Sie solange die englische Version. Wir bitten Sie um Verständnis.

Using native HTML tags

The idea of the JSF 2.2 HTML5 dialect is to start with a native HTML page, and to add a few JSF attributes to make it an JSF view. AngularFaces take this idea to another level.

AngularFaces allows you to use these tags without a preceding "h:", even if there's no "jsf:" attribute:

  • <head /> becomes <h:head />
  • <body /> becomes <h:body />
  • <form /> becomes <h:form />
  • <label /> becomes <h:outputLabel />
  • <button /> becomes <h:commandButton (unless it has a "jsf:outcome" attribute, which converts <button /> into an <h:button>). />
  • <input /> can become many things, depending on the "type" attribute. AngularFaces 2.1 allows you to drop the "type" attribute. In this case, the type is derived from the JSF beans type. Numeric datatypes become "text='number'", java.util.Date becomes "type='date", boolean turns the input field into a check box and everything else becomes "type='text'".

Why, no, I don't want this feature!

You have to add a few lines to the web.xml to activate this features. AngularFaces 2.1 doesn't allow you to get rid of the feature altogether: it's needed internally. But you can chose between a progressive version and a conservative version. The latter only cares about a few tags:

  • h:messages and prime:messages
  • ngsync
  • translate and i18n

BootsFaces

The progressive tag decorator supports most tags of BootsFaces. This feature is activated only if BootsFaces is detected in the classpath.

Read the complete list of supported tag at the BootsFaces showcase.

What it looks like

Even if it's only a handful of changes, it's astonishing how much tidier these few changes make your JSF file looks: