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Using mustaches in JSF attributes

Many JSF attributes can make use of AngularJS mustaches. In that case, they are evaluated on the client, giving you a lot of extra flexibility. When the controller is initialized, the initial value of the attribute is set to the corresponding value in the JSF bean. After that, it's an ordinary variable in the AngularJS scope.

For instance, the AngularTetris demo displays either the settings or the current score. The , depending on whether the game is being played or not:

In this example, the value of game.scoreStyle is either "display:none" or "display:block".

Beware of rendered="false"

It's a bad idea to use rendered="false" to hide a component in an AngularFaces page. AngularFaces uses optimized AJAX responses that update the variables of the scope, but nothing else. Hence, if you show or hide something on the server side using the rendered attribute, the HTML page is never updated. Better use ng-show, ng-hide or - as shown above - either style or styleClass.

Using mustaches in JSF attributes

Many JSF attributes can make use of AngularJS mustaches. In that case, they are evaluated on the client, giving you a lot of extra flexibility. When the controller is initialized, the initial value of the attribute is set to the corresponding value in the JSF bean. After that, it's an ordinary variable in the AngularJS scope.

For instance, the AngularTetris demo displays either the settings or the current score. The , depending on whether the game is being played or not:

In this example, the value of game.scoreStyle is either "display:none" or "display:block".

Beware of rendered="false"

It's a bad idea to use rendered="false" to hide a component in an AngularFaces page. AngularFaces uses optimized AJAX responses that update the variables of the scope, but nothing else. Hence, if you show or hide something on the server side using the rendered attribute, the HTML page is never updated. Better use ng-show, ng-hide or - as shown above - either style or styleClass.

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Using mustaches in JSF attributes

Many JSF attributes can make use of AngularJS mustaches. In that case, they are evaluated on the client, giving you a lot of extra flexibility. When the controller is initialized, the initial value of the attribute is set to the corresponding value in the JSF bean. After that, it's an ordinary variable in the AngularJS scope.

For instance, the AngularTetris demo displays either the settings or the current score. The , depending on whether the game is being played or not:

In this example, the value of game.scoreStyle is either "display:none" or "display:block".

Beware of rendered="false"

It's a bad idea to use rendered="false" to hide a component in an AngularFaces page. AngularFaces uses optimized AJAX responses that update the variables of the scope, but nothing else. Hence, if you show or hide something on the server side using the rendered attribute, the HTML page is never updated. Better use ng-show, ng-hide or - as shown above - either style or styleClass.

Für diese Seite gibt es noch keine deutsche Übersetzung. Bitte lesen Sie solange die englische Version. Wir bitten Sie um Verständnis.

Using mustaches in JSF attributes

Many JSF attributes can make use of AngularJS mustaches. In that case, they are evaluated on the client, giving you a lot of extra flexibility. When the controller is initialized, the initial value of the attribute is set to the corresponding value in the JSF bean. After that, it's an ordinary variable in the AngularJS scope.

For instance, the AngularTetris demo displays either the settings or the current score. The , depending on whether the game is being played or not:

In this example, the value of game.scoreStyle is either "display:none" or "display:block".

Beware of rendered="false"

It's a bad idea to use rendered="false" to hide a component in an AngularFaces page. AngularFaces uses optimized AJAX responses that update the variables of the scope, but nothing else. Hence, if you show or hide something on the server side using the rendered attribute, the HTML page is never updated. Better use ng-show, ng-hide or - as shown above - either style or styleClass.